I Spy Pinhole Eye by Phillip Gross and Simon Denison

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Winner of Wales Book of the Year

In I Spy Pinhole Eye, Simon Denison uses a pinhole camera to transform the most mundane of everyday objects, while Philip Gross’s poems explore the act of seeing and interpretation in a collaborative work that is meditative, playful and profound.

Praise for I Spy Pinhole Eye

Top of the pile is Philip Gross’s set of cracklingly brilliant retakes of Simon Denison’s pinhole camera photographs. Rush for your copy now.

Peter Finch

What Denison presents – the dark rootings of steel and concrete in a flashlit night; the feeling of something slamming into the earth, establishing its narrow vocabulary of grass, stone, mould, leaf, strut, and the strange, focused moony chill that freezes everything – moves through the clarity, steadiness and humaneness of Philip Gross’s verbal imagination to create something new. And that, after all, is the idea: the making new, the exploration, or apprehension of the way things are too much and terrible, as O’Hara saw, there always being something else under and beyond the changing names of things.

George Szirtes

Also see Walesonline, BBC, Guardian.

Philip Gross is an award winning poet, fiction writer, dramatist and creative writing lecturer. His last poetry collection was a Poetry Book Society Recommendation and the one before that a PBS Special Recommendation, whilst The Wasting Game was not only a PBS Recommendation, but also shortlisted for the Whitbread Prize and the Airlines of Mistila was a PBS Choice. Of his twelve poetry collections, two have been limited editions including wood engravings and artist illustrations and two others have been collaborations with artists. Visit his site.

Simon Denison’s documentary and conceptual landscape photography has been exhibited both nationally and internationally. He is the author of two photographic books, The Human Landscape (Greyscale 2002) and Quarry Land (Greyscale 2005). His work has been reviewed widely including in The Times, The Guardian and on BBC Radio 4. He is a lecturer in the history and interpretation of photography at Birmingham City University’s Institute of Art & Design, and he reviews books and exhibitions for the Photography magazine.

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